Monday, January 8, 2018

  FRIENDS and SERVANTS of the WORD Monday, January 8, 2018 WORD of the DAY  After John had been arrested, Jesus came to Galilee proclaiming the gospel of God: “This is the time of fulfillment. The kingdom of God is at hand. Repent, and believe in the gospel.”  As he passed by the Sea of Galilee, he saw Simon and his brother Andrew casting their nets into the sea; they were fishermen.  Jesus said to them, “Come after me, and I will make you fishers of men.”  Then they abandoned their nets and followed him.       (Mark 1: 14-18) How shall I live this Word? Entering into time, Jesus reads, as we do, the events that develop and indicate to us the steps to take.  Everything has an ending and a beginning.  When John leaves the scene because he has been imprisoned, Jesus enters quietly, and starts His preaching.  Only by living in the ‘mystery of communion’ – gift of the Spirit – can each one intuit their mission and know when to step aside, or take the initiative.  Only where the ‘original design’ has been re-established can each one know their mandate, without lies, without confusion, without possessiveness!  What does Jesus...

St. Lucy Virgin and Martyr

  FRIENDS and SERVANTS of the WORD December 13, 2017 St. Lucy, Virgin and Martyr   WORD of the DAY Come to me, all you who labor and are burdened, and I will give you rest.   (Matthew 11: 28) How shall I live this Word? Jesus raised a hymn of praise to the Father because He had hidden things regarding the Kingdom of God from the proud who think they are wise while in reality they are foolish, and Jesus revealed to the little ones the marvels of His Kingdom. Certainly, His road is truth, commitment to goodness and beauty: a life handed over to God, the synthesis and compendium of every true good.  It is not easy to be on His side because keeping a check on evil desires becomes like a yoke, and carrying the burden of loving everyone becomes heavy.   And yet, since the requirement and fulfillment of these things is Love, that yoke is sweet, and that weight is light. There is a premise, an invitation full of theological hope and tenderness: “Come to me”.  And the guests invited – as it happens – are not the satiated who do not care about those who die...